Albuquerque Journal, September 27, 2002

From The Elvis Costello Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
... Bibliography ...
7475767778798081
8283848586878889
9091929394959697
9899000102030405
0607080910111213
1415161718192021


Albuquerque Journal

New Mexico publications

US publications by state
  • ALAKARAZCA
  • COCTDCDEFL
  • GAHA   IA      ID      IL
  • IN   KSKYLA   MA
  • MDME   MIMNMO
  • MSMTNC  ND  NE
  • NHNJNMNVNY
  • OHOKORPARI
  • SCSDTNTXUT
  • VAVTWAWIWY

-

Mellower Costello here Thursday


Joseph Ditzler

For one brief summer, in 1978, I found myself with one of the coolest record collections of anyone I knew.

Easter by Patti Smith; New Boots and Panties, by Ian Dury and the Blockheads ("Sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll, are all my brain and body need"); Love You Live, for my money the best live album by the Rolling Stones; and a personal favorite, The Tubes' What Do You Want From Live were but a few of the vinyl LPs circling the turntable that last, carefree summer before real life.

But the real prize that year, actually from the summer before but still leaving its mark, was My Aim Is True, by a snarling, cryptic, angry young Englishman, a snaggle-toothed anti-matter Buddy Holly, possessed, named Elvis Costello, and his band, The Attractions.

Elvis and a partly reconstituted Attractions come Thursday to the Paolo Soleri on the campus of the Santa Fe Indian School.

Twenty-six years have passed. The man has come full circle, if circle is how it can best be described. He dabbled in country with 1981's Almost Blue, and in 1998 dueted with Burt Bacharach.

Burt Bacharach! Odds are the Elvis of 1977 would have found grounds to provoking Bacharach to a fistfight. But there he was, crooning pianoside while Burt tickled the keys. What next? Will dogs lie down with cats?

It was a long, strange trip. But echoes of the old Elvis haunt his latest release, When I Was Cruel. For former geeks who found a champion in the brilliant lyrics and hammer hard, unforgiving riffs Costello unleashed in the late '70s, it sounds like a return to that spring of resentment at misdirected authority and cruel passion.

But this is much mellower Elvis Costello. The first track, the one most radio listeners can identify, "45," was written on his 45th birthday.

"I was always intrigued by the idea that you look back at a period of time, and you suddenly look at pictures, newsreel footage on some music program or a sports program and you suddenly notice that — there might be footage of the '70s or '80s and it suddenly looks like another time completely, yet you can remember yourself in that time so clearly. Because I've lived to the extremely gray age of 47, I'm able to look back. Well, nine years before I was born, the Second World War was ending. And a lot of things in the life of my parents proceeded from those events and those changes," he said in commentary to the track available on his World Wide Web site.

It's nearly three times nine in terms of years since Elvis Costello thumbed his nose at convention. In the interim it appears he's accomplished a revolution in terms of making music on his own terms and changing the message as times, and his own life, progress.

If you go:
Who: Elvis Costello and The Impostors
When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday
Where: Paolo Soleri Amphitheater, Santa Fe Indian School, 1501 Cerrillos Road
Tickets: $45 reserved, $33.50 general admission; available through Ticketmaster outlets.


Tags: Paolo Soleri AmphitheatreSanta FeNew MexicoThe ImpostersMy Aim Is TrueThe AttractionsAlmost BlueWhen I Was Cruel45Burt BacharachIan DuryThe BlockheadsSex & Drugs & Rock & RollThe Rolling StonesPatti SmithBuddy Holly

-

Albuquerque Journal, September 27, 2002


Joseph Ditzler profiles Elvis Costello ahead of his concert with The Imposters, Thursday, October 3, 2002, Paolo Soleri Amphitheatre, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Images

2002-09-27 Albuquerque Journal, Venue page 04 clipping 01.jpg
Clipping.

Page scan.
2002-09-27 Albuquerque Journal, Venue page 04.jpg

-



Back to top

External links