Toronto Globe and Mail, June 28, 2006

From The Elvis Costello Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
- Bibliography -
7475761977787980
8182838485868788
8990919293949596
9798990001020304
0506070809101112
13141516171819 20


Toronto Globe and Mail

Canada publications

Newspapers

University publications

Magazines

Online publications

-
Jazz

Costello makes himself at home


J.D. Considine

The Vancouver International Jazz Festival

In Vancouver on Sunday and Monday

( extract)

'We want to thank you for making it a special night," Elvis Costello told a capacity crowd at Vancouver's Orpheum Theatre Monday night.

"It's good to be home."

Vancouver counts as home for Costello thanks to his wife, jazz singer and pianist Diana Krall, and part of the reason the evening was special -- apart from the tumultuous response the audience gave his marathon, 32-song set -- was the news that Costello and Krall were expecting their first child in December.

"Does that make me a Canadian now?" he joked, to yelled congratulations.

That Costello felt at home in Vancouver wasn't a surprise; that he felt at home as part of the Vancouver International Jazz Festival might be.

Despite touring with pianist and producer Allen Toussaint, as well as a horn section that occasionally soloed, nothing in his two-hour, 45-minute performance could be considered jazz.

But then, jazz is hardly the only type of music on tap at jazz festivals these days. Rock, blues, hip hop, Afro-pop -- all sorts of sounds turn up, some with no jazz connection at all.

Being married to a jazz musician gives Costello better bona fides than most.

Although emphasizing Costello's current album, a collaboration with Toussaint called The River in Reverse, the performance drew deeply from both artist's catalogues. Costello unearthed such chestnuts as Watching the Detectives, Clubland and a version of Alison that included an interpolation of Smokey Robinson's The Tracks of My Tears, while the Toussaint selections ranged from a solo piano Tipitina and Me to full-band versions of Brickyard Blues and Yes We Can Can.

Thanks to the horn arrangements (mostly by Toussaint), Costello's songs took on a mild R&B flavour, and his singing was unusually supple and expressive -- though not quite as slyly soulful as Toussaint's. Still, it was more than enough to get much of the crowd on its feet and dancing for the last third of the show.

-

The Globe and Mail, June 28, 2006


J.D. Considine reviews Elvis Costello and The Imposters with Allen Toussaint and The Crescent City Horns on Monday, June 26, 2006 at the Vancouver International Jazz Festival, Orpheum Theatre, Vancouver, BC, Canada.


-



Back to top

External links