Difference between revisions of "Daily Kent Stater, April 13, 1989"

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<center><h3> Spike  / New York</h3></center>
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<center><h3> Costello, Reed revive cynicism in new albums </h3></center>
<center>'''Elvis Costello / Lou Reed </center>
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<center>'''Elvis Costello''' / Spike — '''Lou Reed ''' / New York </center>
 
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<center> Will Pfeifer </center>
 
<center> Will Pfeifer </center>
 
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There's a definite shortage of cynicism in the record industry these days. Most songs these days have a world view that's so cheerful as to be dangerous or a calculated "serious" outlook designed to sell records (read Madonna). But as far as real, penetrating cynicism goes, it's been in short supply. At least until recently.
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Longtime cynics Lou Reed and Elvis Costello both have new albums out, and both discs feature a mature, talented artist ruminating on the unusual state of our world.
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Lou Reed's '''New York'' is his first album in several years, and without a doubt his best work since the Velvet Underground. The album weighs in at a whopping 14 songs comprising 58 minutes, but thematically it's like one long song. Think of it as a modern version of "New York, New York" without the romance or 1930s musical mentality.
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Each song addresses another aspect of New York living, usually with a bitter but realistic outlook that emphasizes the sadness of life in the big city — and life in America — very effectively. In "Halloween Parade," subtitled AIDS, Reed describes a parade and the variety of the particpants, but every so often mentions someone not present this year. He never mentions AIDS in the song, but the feeling of loss comes across nonetheless, more power than a song that beats the AIDS angle to death.
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There's a definite feeling of desperation to "New York," as if Reed thinks life in general is going to hell fast and that only anger and righteous indignation will prevent
  
  

Revision as of 16:42, 16 February 2016

... Bibliography ...
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Daily Kent Stater

Ohio publications

Newspapers

University publications

Magazines and alt. weeklies


US publications by state
  • ALAKARAZCA
  • COCTDCDEFL
  • GAHA   IA      ID      IL
  • IN   KSKYLA   MA
  • MDME   MIMNMO
  • MSMTNC  ND  NE
  • NHNJNMNVNY
  • OHOKORPARI
  • SCSDTNTXUT
  • VAVTWAWIWY

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Costello, Reed revive cynicism in new albums

Elvis Costello / Spike — Lou Reed / New York

Will Pfeifer

There's a definite shortage of cynicism in the record industry these days. Most songs these days have a world view that's so cheerful as to be dangerous or a calculated "serious" outlook designed to sell records (read Madonna). But as far as real, penetrating cynicism goes, it's been in short supply. At least until recently.

Longtime cynics Lou Reed and Elvis Costello both have new albums out, and both discs feature a mature, talented artist ruminating on the unusual state of our world.

Lou Reed's 'New York is his first album in several years, and without a doubt his best work since the Velvet Underground. The album weighs in at a whopping 14 songs comprising 58 minutes, but thematically it's like one long song. Think of it as a modern version of "New York, New York" without the romance or 1930s musical mentality.

Each song addresses another aspect of New York living, usually with a bitter but realistic outlook that emphasizes the sadness of life in the big city — and life in America — very effectively. In "Halloween Parade," subtitled AIDS, Reed describes a parade and the variety of the particpants, but every so often mentions someone not present this year. He never mentions AIDS in the song, but the feeling of loss comes across nonetheless, more power than a song that beats the AIDS angle to death.

There's a definite feeling of desperation to "New York," as if Reed thinks life in general is going to hell fast and that only anger and righteous indignation will prevent


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The Daily Kent Stater, April 13, 1989


Will Pfeifer reviews Spike and Lou Reed's New York.

Images

1989-04-13 Daily Kent Stater page 07 clipping 01.jpg 1989-04-13 Daily Kent Stater page 08 clipping 01.jpg
Clippings.

1989-04-13 Daily Kent Stater page 07.jpg 1989-04-13 Daily Kent Stater page 08.jpg
Page scans.

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