Dublin Business Post, November 1, 2020

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Dublin Business Post

UK & Ireland newspapers

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Album reviews: Elvis Costello, Nealo, Laura Veirs

A rock legend, a Dublin-based rapper and a US folkie are all reviewed this week

Tony Clayton-Lea

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Rock/Pop
Elvis Costello
Hey Clockface (Concord Records)

He may have begun his recording career in 1977 as the odd one out of the punk rock movement, but in the intervening years Elvis Costello has travelled further afield creatively than any of his contemporaries.

On this latest studio album, he continues to wilfully avoid categorisation, with languorous ballads (The Last Confession of Vivian Whip, The Whirlwind, Byline), irksome trad jazz (the title track), jagged rock (Hetty O'Hara Confidential) and offbeat spoken word (Radio Is Everything, Revolution #49) swirling around in the melting pot. The result is typically eclectic but, alas, too often underwhelming.


Tags: Hey ClockfaceConcord RecordsThe Last Confession Of Vivian WhipThe WhirlwindBylineHey Clockface / How Can You Face Me?Hetty O'Hara ConfidentialRadio Is EverythingRevolution #49

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Business Post, November 1, 2020


Tony Clayton-Lea reviews Hey Clockface.

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Hey Clockface album cover.jpg

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